Skip to content

What does a British Bulldog and a Queensland Koala have in common?

Birth of the Munro Campaign

In June 2011, PeakCare Queensland commenced our Munro Campaign.

Regular readers of Our Practice Blogs and Facebook will have already received some information about the Munro Campaign:

  • On 8th June 2010, in a blog post headed “The Munro Campaign”, Lindsay Wegener, PeakCare’s Executive Director cleared up any confusion that may have existed concerning whether or not the Munro Campaign was about Marilyn Monroe. Lindsay’s post went on to explain that the Munro Campaign was, in fact,   a strategy being used by PeakCare to comprehensively examine the findings of the United Kingdom’s Review of Child Protection recently completed by Professor Eileen Munro and the relevance of these findings to Queensland. As noted within his post however, Lindsay wondered whether or not – given that Marilyn Monroe was almost smothered to death at the age of two, was sexually assaulted at the age of six and spent most of her childhood in a sequence of foster home and orphanages before suffering a tragic death at the age of 36 – a more purposeful and better functioning child protection system may have made a difference to her life.  If lessons can be learned from the Munro Report that might enable other children and young people to be spared from some of her experiences, then perhaps the Munro Campaign may be seen as, at least in part, inspired by Marilyn Monroe.
  • On 15th June 2010, in a post entitled “The Munro Campaign: The Difference between Saying and Doing”, Lorraine Dupree, PeakCare’s Policy and Research Manager provided an overview of key themes that are addressed within the Munro Report.  Very importantly, Lorraine noted the parallels that exist between these themes and those that feature within the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children that was endorsed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) in 2009.  Perhaps the British Bulldog and Queensland’s Koala do have some characteristics in common…
  • On 21st June 2010, Fiona McColl, PeakCare’s Training and Sector Development Manager  entered a post entitled “The Munro Campaign: Conspicuously Silent”.   Within this post, Fiona recorded her observations about the array of professional associations, regulatory bodies and academic institutions within the UK that both contributed to, and have strongly supported and endorsed, the findings and recommendations of the Munro Review.  Rather provocatively, Fiona’s post questioned whether or not there exists within Queensland, the same range of associations, bodies and institutions able and prepared to identify, critique, influence and support the reforms needed within Queensland’s child protection system and practice.  And where they may exist, who is there that will hear them when they express their collective voice?  If it is thought that the British Bulldog and the Queensland Koala are looking alike – or not alike – who will say so and who will take notice if they do?

NOW it’s time to get down to business…

It’s now time for our Munro Campaign to “shift gears” – to become more direct in the ways in which we explore the implications of the Munro Report for Queensland and more direct in the ways we seek your views about these matters.

This is what we plan to do –

  1. Over oncoming weeks, PeakCare will examine each of the key themes that feature within the Munro Report and provide you with a summary of the key points.
  2. In keeping with the observations made by both Lorraine and Fiona within their posts, this summary will also highlight some of the parallels that exist with the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children.
  3. Where relevant, reference will also be made to relevant research and articles.
  4. Questions will be posed to you about each of the key themes.  These questions will be designed to find out your views and opinions about how relevant (or otherwise) the matters being discussed are to Queensland’s child protection system – whether or not there are issues of concern in relation to these matters and if so, what might be done to constructively and positively address these.

What you can do –

  1. Read and consider the information you receive.
  2. Bring the information to the attention of others within your organisation and colleagues who work in other organisations.
  3. Discuss the information within your work-groups and organisation.
  4. Engage others who belong to your “formal” or “informal” inter-agency or local networks in discussions about this information.
  5. Enter comments – either individually or as a “group” – in response to Our Practice Blogs or alternatively, send your comments via email.

How the collected information will be used

PeakCare will make use of the collected information in a variety of ways in promoting improvements in the delivery of child protection services.  In particular, the information you provide will greatly assist us in planning and focusing the issues to be addressed within a “live-to-air” panel discussion that will be held in the future about the Munro Campaign.  This panel discussion will be PeakCare’s version of a Geoffrey Robertson’s “Hypothetical” with a touch of the ABC’s “Q and A”.

To get the ball rolling –

Prior to commencing our discussion about the key themes featured with the Munro Report and in order to draw parallels between the findings of this Report and the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children, we thought that it might first be useful to find out how familiar people are with the National Framework and whether or not they see it as relevant to their work.  So that’s what our first set of questions is about.

To share your thoughts with us, please click on the image below to fill out a snappy little survey about the National Framework!


Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: